Projected videos to bring life and movement to your event

Video mapping is a projection technique used to display video images on existing architecture or scenic pieces without using any screens. Video mapping can make certain pieces come to life using just the light from the projectors. There are many creative ways to transform a space using projection, and you can show content on the side of buildings, fountains, or simply a blank wall in a banquet room.

There are two main components to video mapping. They are: 

  • High-lumen projectors: In order to achieve life-like video images, you will need to invest in a professional-grade projector. It is sometimes necessary to use multiple projectors to create 3D images and to fully cover the whole surface, especially when covering a large space like the side of a building. 
  • Creative content: An experienced video or graphics effects person can create the perfect content to bring your ideas to life. They will know how to design your content to scale depending on the surface it will eventually be projected on, and make it look great in a 3D space. 

Video Mapping to engage your audience

Event experiences are dominating the way live events are structured. Video mapping provides a memorable experience for your audience that is sure to capture their attention during the event and keep them talking about it long after they leave. In fact, Americans take an average of 21 pictures during live events and share them on social media. Give them something exciting to record with video mapping. 

The possibilities for video mapping are only limited by the strength of your imagination. Here are a few examples of how you can transform your next event using video mapping:

  • Transform your environment to your event’s theme. For example, if your theme is “Under the Sea,” you could use a series of projectors to map along the walls and ceiling of the room to make your guests feel like they are under the ocean, complete with fish, slowly moving seaweed, and waves crashing. Maybe even a mermaid or two! 
  • Bring buildings to life during holidays or special events. This is a great option for shopping centers during the holidays. You can turn part of a wall into a fireplace, or have Santa or the Grinch fly across the building. 
  • Highlight existing architecture. Video mapping can also be used in more subtle ways to highlight certain aspects of the room.
  • Eliminate the need for screens. Sometimes screens will get in the way of your event aesthetic when they are not in use. This is especially true for weddings or other formal events. Video mapping can be used to project onto something more organic, like a white drape, which will become a nice backdrop when not in use.

Video mapping can create unique spaces and really transform your event space without having to build anything custom. It also brings in an element of magic and surprise as guests look around to try to figure out how the mapping works. This is an AV production element that can truly leave a lasting impact on your audience.

Evo event with video mapping.

Video Mapping FAQs

Do I need to get permits to project on the side of a building?

Typically, you do not need to get permits to project on the side of a building. However, the location where you will be placing the projector can sometimes require approval or permits. If you are planning to place the projector across the street, you will need to get permission from the property owner. If you are building trust rigs to fly the projector, you may need a permit from the city. 

There are a few additional considerations when projecting on the side of a building. You’ll want to determine the best place to set up your projector, any special lensing if needed, and what power source you’ll be using.

What’s the difference between 2D and 3D projection mapping?

2D projection mapping is mapping on a flat surface, almost as if it were on a screen. 3D projection mapping, on the other hand, is taking a scenic piece that was painted white, or a piece of architecture, like a fountain or a bar, and using multiple projectors from multiple angles to completely surround that object and display custom 3D content.

2D projection mapping is mapping on a flat surface, almost as if it were on a screen. 3D projection mapping, on the other hand, is taking a scenic piece that was painted white, or a piece of architecture, like a fountain or a bar, and using multiple projectors from multiple angles to completely surround that object and display custom 3D content.